Free Delivery for UK Orders
14 Day Money Back Guarantee
Secure Checkout

Clarke Hall & Morrison on Children

Clarke Hall & Morrison on Children is acknowledged as being the leading work on both the civil jurisdiction of the family courts and the criminal jurisdiction of the youth courts.

Publisher: LNUK
Loose-Leaf
£1,066.99
Quantity
In Stock
Published:
ISBN/ISSN: 9780406996626
Publisher: LNUK

Product description

Why should you buy Clarke Hall & Morrison on Children

 

Clarke Hall & Morrison on Children is acknowledged as being the leading work on both the civil jurisdiction of the family courts and the criminal jurisdiction of the youth courts.

The work gathers together all the legislation, circulars and guidance notes that relate to every aspect of child law. It also includes useful procedural tables, checklists, precedents and flowcharts. Expert commentary explains and clarifies the law throughout and makes sure that the reader is fully aware of its practical implications.

The work includes expert analysis of all the relevant case law and contains all relevant source materials accompanied by explanatory commentary. The service is kept up-to-date through three updating issues per year and regular monthly bulletins which keep the subscriber informed of the latest legislation and cases, including all the recent statutory material from April 2014 relating to the Family Court and updating the Family Procedure Rules 2010. This year the service will also contain new chapters on Mental Health and Employment.

The service is also available on CD-ROM as part of the Butterworths Family and Child Law Library, bringing all the added benefits of electronic delivery such as enhanced search facilities and hypertext links.

Five looseleaf volumes plus a Tables binder, subscribers receive their first year's updating issues as part of the purchase price (three service issues approx. per year). Subscribers are charged annually for subsequent updating.

Table of contents

Binder 1


Division 1: Cardinal Principles and Jurisdution;
Division 2: Part II of the Children Act 1989: Private Law Proceedings;
Division 3: Financial Provision for Children;
Division 4: Family Protection
Division 5: International Child Abduction & Protection;
Division 6: Wardship and Inherent Jurisdution;
Division 7: Part III of the Children Act 1989: Children in Need;
Division 8: Part V of the Children Act 1989: Assessment and Emergency Protection;
Division 9: Part VI of the Children Act 1989: Care Procedings etc;
Division 10: Adoption;
Division 11: Practice and Procedure;
Division 12: Education;
Division 13: Care Standards;
Division 14: Youth Justice;
Division 15: Children's Commissioner;


Binder 2


Division A: Children - Statutes, SI's and Practice Directions;
Division B: Adoption - Statutes, SI's and Practice Directions;


Binder 3


Division C: Family Protection - Statutes, SI's and Practice Directions;
Division D: International Child Abduction - Statutes, SI's and Practice Directions;
Division E: Financial Provision - Statutes, SI's and Practice Directions;
Division F: Education - Statutes, SI's and Practice Directions;


Binder 4


Division G: Care Standards - Statutes, SI's and Practice Directions;
Division H - Youth Justice - Statutes, SI's and Practice Directions;


Binder 5


Appendices;


Binder 6


Tables & Index


100 ISSUE: This issue will keep you fully abreast of all the very latest developments, including:


Division1
Parental order: joint application by a married couple who only had a platonic relationship: Re X;
Procedure: relevance of criminal law to fact-finding in care proceedings;
Human Rights: the latest ECtHR judgments in Weitjen v Germany and Royer v Hungary;
Medical treatment: the implications of the Alfie Evans litigation;
The application of the paramountcy principle to (a) habeas corpus proceedings and (b) a local authority application to withdraw a care application
Jurisdiction: the application of the FLA 1986 to a child present in England and Wales but habitually resident in a non EU State; the position in care proceedings with regard to diplomatic immunity.
Interpreting the revised Brussels II Regulation: application to grandparents’ access; the meaning of no habitual residence under Art 13, and the need to sty proceedings during a pendency of an appeal against a foreign court ruling that it is second seised under Art 19


Division 5
Applying for legal aid in access applications under the 1980 Hague Abduction Convention;
Applying the President’s Guidance on Case Management and Mediation in International Child Abduction proceedings;
Establishing an Art 13 (b) exception where a mother requires a vis to return to the USA;
Setting aside return orders.


Division 6
Local authority use of the inherent jurisdiction to permit them not to serve a violent father with notice of proceedings.